3 Historic Attractions of Athens

It is no secret that Athens is one of the richest places in the world in terms of ancient history. The glories of its past are not only very well known and have wielded much influence, but many of them are also highly visible on the city’s skyline. The key question is, which historic attractions should you see first?

Whether you are walking around the city, or peering out the window of your airport shuttle service vehicle, something of great historical interest will almost always be in your line of sight.

The Acropolis

The fame of the Acropolis is almost incomparable. You’ll very likely catch a first glimpse of it as you pass through on your airport shuttle service but it simply must be explored up close to appreciate it properly. More often than not, the ancient heart of Athens is simply reduced to the Parthenon. Without a doubt, the Doric columns and mythical seat of learning that embodies the centrepiece of the Parthenon is a wonder; however, it is but the penultimate jewel in the classical crown. From the crumbling ruins of the Agora where philosophers bent their minds to weighty thoughts, to the auditorium of Dionysius, which for centuries gave voice to theatrical delights, the Acropolis is a city built upon ruin after ruin. It has stood the test of time and witnessed the passing of cultures, and today holds its own as the true icon of historical Greece.

The Temple of Olympian Zeus

Of lesser pedigree and fame, but no less captivating, is the Temple of Olympian Zeus. Only a short stroll away from the genteel surroundings of the Acropolis, you’ll cross a set of key roads to enter the parkland in which these pillared ruins make their home. You may already have passed on these roads in the airport shuttle service and not even realised how close you were passing to this historical site. Its situation can make the temple seem less significant, as this edifice is surrounded by the everyday trappings of traffic, without pomp and ceremony. However, its importance should not be underestimated. This temple to the king of the gods was begun in the 6th century, and has remained the gateway to Athens in all its forms since Roman times. From the Byzantines to the Turks, the British to the modern day republic, this temple has stood as a doorway to both the past and the Acropolis.

Comments are closed.